Wednesday, October 18, 2017

If You Work From Home, Here’s How to Be Successful

Working from home seems ideal. No need to get dressed and polished for the day, no commute, and no distracting coworkers to face—what’s not to like? But working remotely isn’t as easy as it looks.

The undisputed champion of small talk topics revolves around one question: What do you do for a living? I tell people I’m a writer and that, although I’m technically a freelancer, I have a steady gig with Grammarly. (That insight sometimes evokes the exclamation “Oh em gee! I love Grammarly!” Satisfying.) Inevitably, I’m asked whether “freelancer” means I get to work from home. I do. I’ve been working from home for about twenty years.

Tell people you work from home, and the following conversation almost always ensues:

Person: Aaah, you’re so lucky!

Me: Yeah. It’s pretty cool.

Person: I mean, you can just get out of bed and work in your pajamas.

Me: Well, it’s a little more complicated than that . . .

There’s been a shift toward remote work in recent years. According to Global Workplace Analytics, 50 percent of the U.S. workforce holds a job that allows them to work from home at least part of the time, and approximately 20 to 25 percent of the workforce telecommutes frequently. Everyone seems to want to ditch the commute and the need for a business casual wardrobe and instead work from the relative peace and comfort of their own space.

Top Three Work-from-Home Problems and Their Solutions

I was telecommuting long before telecommuting was cool. I can’t imagine ever having to work outside my home again. And yet, there are some definite challenges that every remote worker faces. Here are my top three, along with some helpful ideas for tackling them.

1 Lack of Discipline

Allow me to speculate that you’re not as disciplined as you think you are. (And if you already know you’re undisciplined, allow me to speculate that you’re even more undisciplined than you concede.) I speak from experience. The siren call of household chores, playtime with your kids or pets, and naps are the least of your concerns.

The most dangerous distraction sits before you at your desk. Social media, YouTube, and the rest of the Internet are just a tab away. Online games lurk there, too. (And, if you’re of the gamer persuasion, you already know that the game icon on your desktop, or the console in the living room, poses a serious threat to your productivity.) Unless you find ways to minimize distractions, they’ll monopolize your work day before you can say “Whoa! Where did the time go?”

Solution:

Learn good time management skills. You can’t stick to a schedule unless you have one, so schedule your time in blocks.

The key is to make your time blocks manageable. If you book yourself for four solid hours of work without a break, you’ll find your mind wandering and your productivity tanking. The Pomodoro Technique, for instance, promotes scheduling twenty-five-minute blocks of work time followed by brief breaks.

Whatever you do on your breaks, I recommend leaving your desk. Stretch, breathe, grab coffee or tea, use the bathroom (thanks coffee or tea), or take the dog for a quick walk. Your body and brain will thank you. Too much sitting can sap your creativity and ability to think clearly. Grabbing ten minutes to do some yoga or go for a quick walk will clear your head and make you more productive.

Here’s a tip: If you find yourself lured away by Facebook or Twitter during your work-time blocks, try tools that keep you from surfing to distracting websites. StayFocusd is a good one for Chrome users. FocusMe, Cold Turkey, and SelfControl are a few other solid options. Oh, and turn off smartphone notifications while you’re at it.

2 Feeling Out of the Loop

If you’re freelancing for multiple clients, this may not apply to you. But if you’re one of the many telecommuters who work remotely for a single employer, staying connected to your team at the office may prove challenging.

There’s nothing like prepping your really cool project ideas only to hear the project was scrapped or has shifted directions, and that you were not only not informed of the change but also not involved in making it. In addition to leaving you feeling like you’ve wasted time, it serves as a reminder that being out-of-sight sometimes means being out-of-mind.

Solution:

Fortunately, there’s a lot of technology at your fingertips to make communicating with your colleagues easier. Stay active on company chat platforms like Slack. Don’t be afraid to ask questions when you feel ill-informed. Be persistent and go after the information you need in order to do your job. Never use “I wasn’t in the loop” as an excuse.

Be your own advocate. Ask to be included in meetings via video conference so you’ll have better insight into projects. If you can’t attend a meeting, ask a colleague for a quick debriefing by phone. You’ll feel more connected and tuned in.

Don’t make yourself difficult to get in touch with, either. If you’re required to be available during working hours, then consider yourself on the clock and answer promptly when your coworkers message or email you. If you’re accessible, your coworkers will be more likely to include you.

3 Going Stir Crazy

It’s already difficult to make friends as an adult. It’s doubly difficult when you don’t go to an office and connect with your coworkers. There are no daily break room chats, there’s no bonding over sports scores, and no getting the recipe for that awesome veggie dip Dave brought to the last office luncheon. You’re on a solo mission, and yeah, it can get lonely.

Working from home sounds great until you consider how isolated it can make you feel. Staying connected with your colleagues in the ways I described can certainly help, but it’s still no substitute for face-to-face interaction with people. You’ll have to make some extra effort to avoid becoming a creepy recluse.

Solution:

Make time for the friends you already have. Don’t turn down social invitations because you’re tempted to work—get your work done on schedule so that you can keep your evenings and weekends free. You need the downtime just as much as someone who reports to an office does.

Here’s a tip: If you don’t work on a set schedule, make one for yourself. Work reasonable hours. With few exceptions (crunch times, or when you’re getting caught up due to illness or time off), give yourself weekends off. Don’t be tempted to overwork just because your work is always within reach.

Find activities outside work that you can join. A few years back, I found myself becoming a work-obsessed hermit. I realized that, despite my tendency toward introversion, I needed to get myself out amongst people if I was going to be a happy and well-rounded. I love to sing, so I joined a community choir. I’ve since made some great friends, and rehearsals give me a reason to look forward to Mondays.

If finding a hobby or activity isn’t your jam, then at least consider working outside your office now and then. Take your laptop to a coffeehouse where you can watch people, and maybe even interact with a few, as you get work done. (You might be surprised by how well you work in that type of environment.) You could also look into co-working spaces or shared office space in your area.

Working from home can be wonderful. Right now, I’m sitting at my desk with a fresh cup of coffee to my left, a sleeping dog to my right, and a ukulele behind me. As soon as I send this article off to my editor, I’ll finish the coffee, strum the uke for a few minutes, and then walk the dog. It works for me because I’ve learned how to make it work. Here’s to making it work for you!

The post If You Work From Home, Here’s How to Be Successful appeared first on Grammarly Blog.


from Grammarly Blog
https://www.grammarly.com/blog/work-from-home/

Lesson 288 - Parts of the Sentence - Sentence Variety

Having learned about phrases and clauses, let's now use the following phrases and clauses to give variety to our writing: participial phrases, adverb clauses, adjective clauses, compound sentences or verbs.

First identify which of the above ways is used in the sentence, and then rewrite it using the three other ways identifying each of the methods used.

Example: Having finished my lessons, I sat back and gloried in my effort. = participial phrase

You must rewrite it using an adverb clause, adjective clause, and either a compound sentence or a simple sentence with compound verbs.

I finished my lessons, sat back, and gloried in my effort. = compound verbs

After I had finished my lessons, I sat back and gloried in my effort. = adverb clause

I who had finished my lessons sat back and gloried in my effort. = adjective clause

Instructions: Identify the written sentence and rewrite it the other three ways.

1. The engineer knew the train was on time, leaned against the side, and sighed with relief.

2. Hoping to have the seating in place by evening, the committee for the Olympics hurriedly set up bleachers along the main road.

3. Mark took a quick, refreshing swim in the mountain lake before he returned to the cabin for breakfast.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. compound verbs

Knowing the train was on time, the engineer leaned against the side and sighed with relief. = participial phrase

The engineer that knew the train was on time leaned against the side and sighed with relief. = adjective clause

When the engineer leaned against the side and sighed with relief, he knew the train was on time. = adverb clause

2. participial phrase

The committee for the Olympics hoped to have the seating in place by evening and hurriedly set up bleachers along the main road. = compound verb

The committee for the Olympics that hoped to have the seating in place by evening hurriedly set up bleachers along the main road. = adjective clause

Because they hoped to have the seating in place by evening, the committee for the Olympics hurriedly set up bleachers along the main road. = adverb clause

3. adverb clause

Having taken a quick, refreshing swim in the mountain lake, Mark returned to the cabin for breakfast. = participial phrase

Mark who had taken a quick, refreshing swim in the mountain lake returned to the cabin for breakfast. = adjective clause

Mark took a quick, refreshing swim in the mountain lake and returned to the cabin for breakfast. = compound verbs

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.
from Daily Grammar Lessons Blog
http://dailygrammarlessons.blogspot.com/2017/10/lesson-288-parts-of-sentence-sentence.html

Tuesday, October 17, 2017

5 Things You Must Do Every Morning to Be More Productive at Work

On waking up, your bleary eyes note that your phone’s alarm presents two options: “Snooze” and “OK.” Both buttons are the same size, but somehow the word snooooooze seems not only longer but vastly more alluring than the resigned okay you muffle into your pillow, followed by a pleading Don’t make me do stuff to no one.

Getting out of bed and hauling yourself to work can be unfun. There’s good reason you insist on getting paid to do it, after all. Once you’re there though, it might not seem so terrible—particularly on days when you find your flow and get a lot done.

Establishing a way to do this consistently—devising a morning routine that’s high on accomplishment and low on dread—is worth making some adjustments for. Here are five tips to make your mornings more productive.

1. Wake up refreshed.

Surprise! The secret to not feeling drained from the moment you wake up actually starts the night before as you’re making your way toward bed. There’s a lot to be said on ways to get a decent night’s sleep, but here are a few highlights:

  • Be mindful of how much caffeine you’ve had, especially later in the day.
  • See also alcohol, which can undercut the quality of your sleep.
  • Life’s too short to wonder why your upstairs neighbor rearranges his entire bedroom every night around 11:45. Tell him to cut it out, or invest in some earplugs or a white noise machine.
  • Also look into getting a blackout curtain, for that one light across the alley that’s somehow angled to shine directly at your headboard.

It might also be wise to consider what kind of content you ingest as you’re winding down. Alas, Monday night might not be the best time to binge three straight episodes of Stranger Things, lest you trigger a febrile can’t-sleep-better-watch-more-addictive-programming feedback loop. It’s worth noting some folks swear by putting away anything with a screen an hour before bedtime to focus on reading actual paper books or magazines.

2. Give yourself something to look forward to.

You have to get out of bed. It helps to have an enticing reason besides needing a paycheck.

Maybe every morning you fry two eggs in your favorite cast-iron skillet, and this small ritual comprises 60 percent of your willingness to get moving. Or maybe the draw is a fancy coffee system.

Then again, maybe you prefer to skip breakfast. (It’s fine.) Maybe if you rise early enough, you’ll have time for a run before wrangling your kids. Whatever the case, it’s good to build something into your morning routine that helps you feel more like a person and less like an extremely grouchy cog.

Also, if the thing you’re looking forward to is pre-gaming for work with The Daily or some fresh trap beats in the car to get amped for that sales call, you already have a head start on the next item…

3. Make your commute matter.

For many people, commuting is the least enjoyable part of the day—the part where the implacable whimsies of traffic steal away crucial increments of everything else you’d rather be doing.

Depending on where you live, you may be able to mitigate some of your frustration by giving some folks a ride and enjoying the carpool lane—or use your time on mass transit to tackle emails, study up for a pitch meeting, or mentally rehearse that presentation you have to give.

If none of that is realistic though, you can still dedicate some commute time to thinking through Step 4—which applies even if you’re one of the lucky souls who regularly works from home.

4. Set goals for yourself. Make a list.

You probably have some idea of what you’ll try to achieve before you sit down to work, but listing it can be a clarifying exercise, and research suggests putting it in writing goes a long way toward making sure it gets done.

This process can also help you set priorities and organize your day. If useful insights or creative possibilities come to mind as you dash off everything you hope to accomplish, jot them down as well.

Where possible, it’s good to set benchmarks you can measure against, so you can hold yourself accountable. Budgeting time for each task is worthwhile, but be practical as you do so: offices are distracting places, coffee makers and printers are not always paragons of efficiency when you need them, and meetings scheduled to last fifteen minutes that are actually done that quickly are tiny, beautiful miracles.

In other words, make a list, use it to forge ahead, and go easy on yourself when you’re suddenly called upon to put out someone else’s fire. One of the advantages of writing down everything you mean to get done, after all, is that you’re less likely to lose track of it altogether.

5. Eliminate distractions where possible.

While you probably check your notifications on social media at the start of each day, if you’re not careful, the churning, time-sucking back-and-forth ha-haha-hahahah of comments and replies can sabotage your whole gameplan for the morning.

Consider logging off for a while if you can. If not, say, because monitoring social media is part of your job, then treat it like one and partition time for it so it doesn’t devour your productivity.

Another culprit in the case of You vs. Lost Time is email, and it can be a savage force. Psychologists have found if you’re constantly managing emails on top of whatever task you’re trying to focus on, you’re probably not doing either very effectively:

An unfortunate limitation of the human mind is that it cannot perform two demanding tasks simultaneously, so flipping back and forth between two different tasks saps cognitive resources. As a result, people can become less efficient in each of the tasks they need to accomplish. In addition to providing an unending source of new tasks for our to-do lists, email could also be making us less efficient at accomplishing those tasks.

The solution? Be deliberate about when you’ll spend time on your inbox.

Finding a morning groove that works with the demands of your career and your life takes time and experimentation. And while it may never be perfect, it’s worth practicing and continually tuning. Once you start to get it down, you’ll be able to see the difference in the form of results by lunchtime.

The post 5 Things You Must Do Every Morning to Be More Productive at Work appeared first on Grammarly Blog.


from Grammarly Blog
https://www.grammarly.com/blog/morning-productivity/

Lesson 287 - Parts of the Sentence - Sentence Variety

Having learned about phrases and clauses, let's now use the following phrases and clauses to give variety to our writing: participial phrases, adverb clauses, adjective clauses, compound sentences or verbs.

First identify which of the above ways is used in the sentence, and then rewrite it using the three other ways identifying each of the methods used.

Example: Having finished my lessons, I sat back and gloried in my effort. = participial phrase

You must rewrite it using an adverb clause, adjective clause, and either a compound sentence or a simple sentence with compound verbs.

I finished my lessons, sat back, and gloried in my effort. = compound verbs

After I had finished my lessons, I sat back and gloried in my effort. = adverb clause

I who had finished my lessons sat back and gloried in my effort. = adjective clause

Instructions: Identify the written sentence and rewrite it the other three ways.

1. At dusk the manager threw the electrical switch, and the amusement park lit up like a star-studded galaxy.

2. As he walked out on the wire and completed his various routines, the acrobat carefully demonstrated his intricate ability.

3. The people who saw the basketball star surged against the restraints and called out compliments and greetings.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. compound sentence

Throwing the electrical switch at dusk, the manager lit up the amusement park like a star-studded galaxy. = participial phrase

At dusk the manager who threw the electrical switch lit up the amusement park like a star-studded galaxy. = adjective clause

After the manager threw the electrical switch, the amusement park lit up like a star-studded galaxy at dusk. = adverb clause

2. participial phrase

When he had demonstrated his intricate ability, the acrobat carefully walked out on the wire and completed his various routines. = adverb clause

The acrobat demonstrated his intricate ability, carefully walked out on the wire, and completed his various routines. = compound verbs

The acrobat who carefully walked out on the wire and completed his various routines demonstrated his intricate ability. = adjective clause

3. adjective clause

Seeing the basketball star, the people surged against the restraints and called out compliments and greetings. = participial phrase

When the people saw the basketball star, they surged against the restraints and called out compliments and greetings. = adverb clause

The people saw the basketball star, and they surged against the restraints and called out compliments and greetings. = compound sentence

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in eBook and Workbook format.
from Daily Grammar Lessons Blog
http://dailygrammarlessons.blogspot.com/2017/10/lesson-287-parts-of-sentence-sentence.html

Monday, October 16, 2017

Lesson 286 - Parts of the Sentence - Sentence Variety

Having learned about phrases and clauses, let's now use the following phrases and clauses to give variety to our writing: participial phrases, adverb clauses, adjective clauses, compound sentences, or verbs.

First identify which of the above ways is used in the sentence, and then rewrite it using the three other ways identifying each of the methods used.

Example: Having finished my lessons, I sat back and gloried in my effort. = participial phrase

You must rewrite it using an adverb clause, adjective clause, and either a compound sentence or a simple sentence with compound verbs.

I finished my lessons, sat back, and gloried in my effort. = compound verbs

After I had finished my lessons, I sat back and gloried in my effort. = adverb clause

I who had finished my lessons sat back and gloried in my effort. = adjective clause

Instructions: Identify the written sentence and rewrite it the other three ways.

1. Watching the sunset above the mountain, John noticed the colors blending softly into one another.

2. The excited horse pawed the ground rapidly while it chewed on its bit and neighed continually.

3. The pilot climbed into his jet plane, adjusted his helmet, and attached his oxygen pack.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

(My rewrites are only one way that can be used. Other ways may be possible.)

1. participial phrase

John watched the sunset above the mountain, and he noticed the colors blending softly into one another. = compound sentence

While he watched the sunset above the mountain, John noticed the colors blending softly into one another. = adverb clause

John who was watching the sunset above the mountain noticed the colors blending softly into one another. = adjective clause

2. adverb clause

The excited horse which pawed the ground rapidly chewed on its bit and neighed continually. = adjective clause

Pawing the ground rapidly, the excited horse chewed on its bit and neighed continually. = participial phrase

The excited horse pawed the ground rapidly, chewed its bit, and neighed continually = compound verbs

3. compound verbs

Climbing into his jet plane, the pilot adjusted his helmet and attached his oxygen pack. = participial phrase

After he climbed into his jet plane, the pilot adjusted his helmet and attached his oxygen pack. = adverb clause

The pilot who climbed into his jet plane adjusted his helmet and attached his oxygen pack. = adjective clause

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.
from Daily Grammar Lessons Blog
http://dailygrammarlessons.blogspot.com/2017/10/lesson-286-parts-of-sentence-sentence.html

This Is How to Evaluate a Future Employer in a Job Interview

Do you have an interview coming up? You are probably preparing for it all wrong! Typical job candidates spend most of their time rehearsing answers. Instead, they should be looking for ways to evaluate their potential employer. Here’s how to use your job interview to find out if a job is right for you.

Why You Should Evaluate Potential Employers

Harvard Business Review reported that, on average, workers change jobs once every three or four years. Of course, an employee might change jobs for unavoidable or unforeseeable reasons. Others unknowingly set themselves up for failure on the job interview.

A recent study by Leadership IQ found that nearly half of newly-hired employees fail within the first 18 months. For some of these new workers, the problem is that they struggle to fit into the company’s culture. Within the first few weeks of working a new job, they might find out that they don’t work well with their supervisors, but it’s too late! Eventually, their discontent is too strong, and they quit the job they worked so hard to acquire. What a waste!

RELATED: 4 Must-see Ways to Improve Your LinkedIn Profile

Boris Groysberg, a Harvard Business School professor, says that the ability to evaluate a job offer is an essential skill for modern professionals. “Yet,” the Harvard Business article states, “most people do it poorly.” Thankfully, you can discover a significant amount of information about your employer during the interview. Equipped with the facts, you can decide whether the job will work for you.

Ask the Right Questions

According to Dr. Thomas J. Denham, founder of Careers in Transition LLC, your boss is one of the seven most important factors of job satisfaction. “Without a boss who is committed to helping you learn and succeed, other benefits aren’t worth as much.” In Denham’s article “Evaluating Job Offers and Negotiating Salary,” he suggests gauging your chemistry with your boss just like you would with a romantic prospect. Do you get along with him or her? Would you feel comfortable with your potential boss’s management style? Is he or she interested in your growth?

To discover these factors, ask if your interviewer minds a few get-to-know-you questions, such as “Why did you decide to enter this career? What do you like best about your job? What’s the hardest part about working here?”

What the Answers Reveal

How did the employer respond when you suggested asking questions of your own?

With Dismissiveness: A flippant or incomplete response is a red flag. The supervisor may be stingy with her time—a potential disaster if you need clarification of job tasks in the future.

With Outrage: Does he seem offended that you dare to question him? If he doesn’t realize that it’s important for you to evaluate the job, he might never have your interests at heart. You want to work for someone who considers your needs, not someone who gets huffy under the slightest provocation.

With Delight: If the interviewer is pleased that you’re so interested in getting to know her, it’s a good sign! Don’t you want an employer who is open and friendly?

With Criticism: Kay Bosworth, a former editor for a business education magazine, describes a good boss: “He is honest and straightforward, which means you should not have to worry about where you stand with him. He’s willing to share responsibility when things go wrong.” If the manager blames his team for problems during the interview, you might be next under fire if you work under his direction.

With Seriousness: A reasonable manager would realize that the more you know about your working conditions, the better you can evaluate if you will fit in with the company. Your questions deserve respect. Complete answers reveal that the boss takes your concerns seriously.

If the Interviewer Isn’t the Boss

What should you do if someone other than the boss conducts the interview? You can still learn much about management from the interview. You might ask what resources will be provided to do your job. If the resources are scarce, it could reveal that the managers are out of touch with the needs of the employees or that the company might be struggling to make ends meet.

Also, take a gander around the building before and after your interview. Do the employees seem happy? How is the workspace? Contented employees usually invest time in making their offices homey because they want to stay at their job long-term. Bare personal cubicles indicate that employees have a sense of detachment from their job.

Don’t lose the opportunity to get to know your future employer. If you ask the right questions, you’ll successfully evaluate whether the job is a good fit for you. What will your next interview reveal? Much will depend on how observant you are.

The post This Is How to Evaluate a Future Employer in a Job Interview appeared first on Grammarly Blog.


from Grammarly Blog
https://www.grammarly.com/blog/future-employer/

Friday, October 13, 2017

9 Ways to Discuss Frequent Career Changes in a Job Interview

Your recent work history is a bit flighty.

No position in the last few years has lasted longer than a year or so.

There are already so many ways to mess up in an interview.

You have great skills and dedication; how do you communicate it to a hiring team when your resume screams something else?

Here are our best tips for handling frequent career changes during the hiring process.

1Don’t draw extra attention to the frequent changes.

This one should be pretty obvious, but standard approaches to resume-writing basically highlight the chronology of your work history.

Consider teeing up your experience in a less conventional way. Functional resumes focus on skills and achievements rather than pure work experience. More simply, consider re-positioning the typical “Work History” section as “Experience” and include any relevant projects or volunteering.

2Make sure you can explain each move as a progression.

For any experience on your resume—but especially for frequent career changes—take time to think through and practice talking about your experience story. Try to frame all your experience as the necessary and inevitable path that culminates with this new employer.

To this end, focus on what you learned and how each change was good for your growth. Bonus points if you can connect any of these growth points to skills you will need for the prospective job.

3Emphasize what you learned and what you achieved.

When you’re putting together your “Experience Narrative,” making all those career changes make sense will really come down to how much growth and achievement you can show in spite of those short stints. For each position, nail down what specifically you learned and what you achieved in concrete terms.

Here’s a tip: Frequent career changes are a red flag to employers. Each hire is an investment, so they want new hires to stick around and provide a return on that investment.

When you are discussing your growth and achievements, keep in mind that you are trying to convince your interviewer that they will get that return. Make sure that you have a clear sense of your past successes and can discuss them at length.

4Focus on the pain points you’re good at fixing.

Prior to your interview, make sure you get a good grasp of the needs of the company and how the job you’re applying for is meant to meet those needs. Next, compare those needs to your skills and achievements. Identify those problems that your skills will be able to solve.

During your interview, find ways to relate and discuss those skills in relation to the problems you identified. Take time to highlight your strengths here and take a stab at initial problem-solving with your interviewer. This will not only emphasize the applicability of your skillset, but also shows your familiarity with the company and eagerness to work on these issues.

5Highlight the long-term commitments you do have.

If you have long-term commitments in other parts of your life—whether it’s a long-term volunteering position or even years spent training for a sport—take whatever you have and make it clear on your resume.

During your interview, if the issue of commitment comes up, it’s fine to acknowledge it. However, try to emphasize that you do have experience with long-term projects or endeavors—and that you see a lot of potential with the prospective company.

6It’s OK to have bowed out over structural changes.

If some of your recent career moves were due to mergers and organizational changes, be ready to briefly discuss those circumstances. It’s understandable, for example, that after a merger the management and roles on your team shifted and left you without a clear path for growth.

7Deemphasize lateral career changes in the same field.

Interviewers strongly frown upon lateral career changes where you essentially move into the same position, especially if that move is within the same industry. It’s good to de-emphasize these shifts in your resume and focus on them in your interview prep so that you can successfully explain the story and growth from that change.

8Never make it about money.

Here’s a tip: Don’t bring up the money question during your interviewing process. Let the interviewing team initiate that conversation.

If an interviewer asks you why you left a job and you respond that it was because of the pay, you don’t look savvy. Suddenly it appears that you only care about money and become a flight risk to the hiring team.

9Ask about career growth.

Do you know what sends a good signal about your willingness to put down roots?

Painting a picture of a future together. You don’t have to do this explicitly, but you can send good signals by asking about career development within the company. It shows that you are planning for your future, and you’re open to that future being with this new company.

Have you frequently changed jobs and successfully negotiated an interview? What worked best for you?

The post 9 Ways to Discuss Frequent Career Changes in a Job Interview appeared first on Grammarly Blog.


from Grammarly Blog
https://www.grammarly.com/blog/frequent-career-changes/